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International news

The World Medical Association

The latest editions of the World Medical Journal is now available on their website

 

It includes articles on the following topics:

- Welcome Remarks, WMA General Assembly, Berlin, Germany, 7 October 2022 
- Valedictory Speech by the WMA President, Dr. Heidi Stensmyren 
- Inaugural Address by the WMA President, Dr. Osahon Enabulele 
- WMA General Assembly Report 
- WMA International Code Of Medical Ethics 
- WMA Declaration of Berlin on Racism in Medicine 
- WMA Declaration of Edinburgh on Prison Conditions and the Spread of Communicable Diseases 
- WMA Declaration of Venice on End of Life Medical Care 
- WMA Declaration on Discrimination against Elderly Individuals within Healthcare Settings 
- WMA Declaration on Patient Safety 
- WMA Statement on Assisted Reproductive Technologies 
- WMA Statement on Digital Health 
- WMA Statement on Health Hazards of Tobacco Products and Tobacco-Derived Products 
- WMA Statement on Physicians Treating Relatives 
- WMA Statement on the Professional and Ethical Use of Social Media 
- WMA Statement on the Global Burden of Chronic Non-Communicable Disease 
- WMA Declaration on the Protection and Integrity of Medical Personnel in Armed Conflicts and Other Situations of Violence 
- WMA Statement on Workplace Violence in the Health Sector 
- WMA Resolution for Providing COVID-19 Vaccines for All 
- WMA Resolution in Support of Medical Personnel and Citizens of Ukraine in the Face of the Russian Invasion 
- WMA Resolution on Humanitarian and Medical Aid to Ukraine 
- WMA Statement on Occupational and Environmental Health and Safety 
- Interview with the WMA Past President 
- Interview with the WMA President 
- Canada’s Medically Administered Death (MAD) Expansion for Mental Illness: Targeting the Most Vulnerable 
- 2022 Monkeypox Outbreak - Teachings from Concurrent Public Health Emergencies 
- Towards the Ocean-Blue Nautical Medicine 
- WMA Members Share Reflections about One Health Day 2022 
- World Diabetes Day 2022: A Global Call to Action to Improve Diabetes Care

 

 

An immediate and unconditional end to violence against health personnel in Iran has been called for by the World Medical Association.

 

In an open letter to the President of Iran, the WMA refers to the alarming rate of violence with reports of arrests, ill treatment and at least one physician killed by security forces.

 

WMA President Dr. Osahon Enabulele writes: ‘Reports indicate that ambulances are used for transporting security forces and people arrested, and physicians are being coerced to falsify medical records and death certificates to cover up violence and torture. We heard as well that in some locations, security personnel had prevented physicians and nurses from treating injured protestors, who were then arrested in the emergency rooms.’

 

He goes on: ‘We are seriously concerned by these shocking practices impeding the provision of health care for those in need and failing to protect health personnel in the pursuit of their mission, in flagrant violation of fundamental human rights standards, including the right to health and the freedom of expression.

‘We strongly condemn such inappropriate violence by the security forces, arbitrary detentions as well as the misuse of medical facilities for the deliberate purposes of repressing demonstrations.

‘Standing in solidarity with our Iranian colleagues, we demand safe working conditions for physicians and other health personnel in the pursuit of their mission, as well as full access to health care to all those in need.

‘We call for an immediate and unconditional end of violence as well as independent investigations as a step towards pursuing accountability for the most serious crimes under international law committed in Iran.’

 


The General Assembly which took place in Berlin, adopted essential new policies and policy revisions, reflecting the latest consensus opinions of our profession.

You will find below the list of adopted policies from this meeting.

  • WMA International Code of Medical Ethics (revised)

  • WMA Declaration of Berlin on Racism in Medicine

  • WMA Declaration of Edinburgh on Prison Conditions and the Spread of Tuberculosis and
    Other Communicable Diseases (revised)

  • WMA Declaration of Venice on End of Life Medical Care (revision)

  • WMA Declaration on Discrimination against Elderly Individuals within Healthcare Settings

  • WMA Declaration on Patient Safety (revised)

  • WMA Statement on Assisted Reproductive Technologies (revised)

  • WMA Statement on Guiding Principles for the Use of Telehealth for the Provision of Health
    Care (revised)

  • WMA Statement on Health Hazards of Tobacco Products and Tobacco-Derived Products
    (revised)

  • WMA Statement on Physicians Treating Relatives

  • WMA Statement on Professional and Ethical Use of Social Media (revised)

  • WMA Statement on the Global Burden of Chronic Disease (revised)

  • WMA Statement on the Protection and Integrity of Medical Personnel in Armed Conflicts and Other Situations of Violence (revised)

  • WMA Statement on Violence in the Health Sector by Patients and Those Close to Them (revised)

  • WMA Resolution for Providing Covid-19 Vaccines for All

  • WMA Resolution in support of Medical Personnel and Citizens of Ukraine in the face of the Russian invasion

  • WMA Resolution on Humanitarian and Medical Aid to Ukraine

  • WMA Resolution on Occupational and Environmental Health and Safety (revised)

 

Klik here to download all these new policies.

 

An updated version of the International Code of Medical Ethics has been agreed and published by the World Medical Association.

 

The revised Code, regarded as the foundation of ethical principles for physicians worldwide, defines the professional duties of physicians towards their patients, other physicians and health professionals, themselves, and society as a whole. It was adopted today in a unanimous vote at the WMA’s annual General Assembly in Berlin by physician leaders from almost 60 national medical associations.

 

The Code was first adopted in 1949 and last revised in 2006, and the new version includes for the first time sections on patient autonomy, physician well-being, remote treatment and environmental sustainability.

 

The revision process has taken the WMA three years and involved several expert regional conferences and public consultation.

 

During the debates, the most contentious proposal concerned mandatory referral, obliging doctors who object to controversial procedures such as physician assisted suicide or abortion to refer to a willing doctor. After considerable debate, a compromise agreement was reached that does not require doctors to refer in case of a conscientious objection. Rather, the compromise says ‘Physician conscientious objection to provision of any lawful medical interventions may only be exercised if the individual patient is not harmed or discriminated against and if the patient’s health is not endangered.

 

‘The physician must immediately and respectfully inform the patient of this objection and of the patient’s right to consult another qualified physician and provide sufficient information to enable the patient to initiate such a consultation in a timely manner’.

 

The Code says that physicians must respect not only the dignity and the rights of patients, but also explicitly mentions their autonomy. For the first time the Code refers to environmental health, saying ‘The physician should strive to practise medicine in ways that are environmentally sustainable with a view to minimising environmental health risks to current and future generations.’

 

Remote treatment is included for the first time. The Code says: ‘When providing medical care remotely, the physician must ensure that this form of communication is medically justifiable and that the necessary medical care is provided. The physician must also inform the patient about the benefits and limitations of receiving medical care remotely, obtain the patient’s consent, and ensure that patient confidentiality is upheld. Wherever medically appropriate, the physician must aim to provide care to the patient through direct, personal contact.’

 

And finally, the Code declares that physicians must attend to their own health, well-being, and abilities, and seek appropriate care to ensure that they are able to practise safely.

 

Klik here to download the update version.

Publicatie datum: 05/01/2023